Saturday, October 3, 2009

Andrei Rublev

Immediately suppressed by the Soviets in 1966, Andrei Tarkovsky’s epic masterpiece is a sweeping medieval tale of Russia’s greatest icon painter. Too experimental, too frightening, too violent, and too politically complicated to be released officially, Andrei Rublev has existed only in shortened, censored versions until the Criterion Collection created this complete 205-minute director’s cut special edition.

Interesting documentary on Tarkovsky.

7 comments:

  1. Rick, you had mentioned Andrei Rublev. Great film! Probably Tarkovsky's most accessible film but in it one finds the seed for all his later works.

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  2. I have Solaris on hold at my local library. What else would you recommend?

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  3. The Mirror and Nostalgia are both really good. He also did a fun take on Hemingway's The Killers, which is worth checking out. I think it was his student film. It is included in the Criterion box set of The Killers.

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  4. Okay, thanks.

    By the way, everytime I look at the pic accompanying your posts -- that appears to be John Lurie -- I recall that John, his brother Evan and I grew up in the same neighborhood in Worcester, Mass. and played many games of baseball and touch football together as kids.

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  5. Good eye. It is John Lurie from his younger days. Love his "Lounge Lizards," not to mention his movies.

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  6. Andrei Rublev is my favorite film. The French and Italian directors of the 60s and 70s fill up most of my top 10, but Tarkovsky is the master.

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  7. Nice to have you post, antigen. One of my favorite movies is Mikhalkov's Dark Eyes in which he worked with Marcello Mastroianni.

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